Home Server Deluxe April 2016 and more
Posted on: 04/05/2016 07:53 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

AZIO MGK 1 RGB Mechanical Keyboard Review
FSP Hydro X 450 Power Supply Review
Home Server Deluxe - April 2016
Intel’s Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition 10-Core Broadwell-E Monster Processor Breaks Cover, 25MB Cache
Kingston 32GB UHS-I U3 microSDHC Review
Microsoft Build 2016 post-analysis (and why developers are happy again)
ROCCAT Ryos MK FX Review
Sama Forza Titanium 800 W
Speedlink Parthica Core gaming keyboard review
X2 Spitzer 20 PC Chassis Review
Z170 Motherboard Charts: 17 Models tested - MSI Z170I Gaming Pro AC

AZIO MGK 1 RGB Mechanical Keyboard Review
Two weeks ago, I received my Iron Ring, signaling the beginning of my career as an engineer. However, it did not really mean a whole lot to me yet, especially as I still have a month of school to go. While the ceremony itself was interesting itself, since then, I have found it hard to actually remove the ring from my hand. No, this is not like a "Lord of the Rings" ring to rule them all, especially everyone else there received a ring like mine. Rather, I have become used to the ring itself. When I first received it, it was weird to keep it on, and I fidgeted with it all the time. After two weeks, however, my right handed pinky finger feels lighter and feels awkward without the ring on. This is quite like my left wrist, as it feels really awkward to not have a watch on. Some of my friends attributed it to feeling naked without their timepiece. Once you get used to having a sort of accessory on yourself, it feels weird to not have it on compared to having it. Similarly, this can also be seen with keyboards and wrist rests. I only was recently introduced to having a wrist rest with the Patriot Viper V760, but after a few weeks of using it, I cannot even go to any keyboard without one. Considering I use it every day now to rest my palms upon, it feels awkward to use any other keyboard without some sort of hand support. Thankfully today's AZIO MGK 1 RGB comes with one. With a full plastic removable palm rest, in addition to a similar floating design to the Viper V760, is this keyboard something I will get used to, and furthermore, not be able to live without? Will it have features that stand above the rest? Let us see what AZIO offers to us with their first product at APH Networks, the MGK 1 RGB!


Read full article @ APH Networks

FSP Hydro X 450 Power Supply Review
After the Hydro G series, FSP decided to release a more affordable power supply called the Hydro X, which targets systems with lower energy needs. This PSU line consists of three units, and in this review we're testing the entry-level 450W model.


Read full article @ Toms Hardware

Home Server Deluxe - April 2016
The Deluxe edition of the Home Server distinguishes itself from the standard home server by its smaller size and more powerful hardware. That makes the server also suitable for using the ZFS file system. This server is more versatile and takes up less space, and is a lot more expensive.

Please note: the PC Buyer’s Guide is compiled based on independent component tests performed by Hardware.Info. If no new, superior products are released that should replace one or more of the components, then the component(s) will remain the same as the previous month.


Read full article @ Hardware.Info

Intel’s Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition 10-Core Broadwell-E Monster Processor Breaks Cover, 25MB Cache
It's a good thing Intel waited until the weekend to let slip a mention of its forthcoming Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition processor on its website, because had the Santa Clara chip maker jumped the gun, everyone might assume it was an April Fool's Day prank. That's not the case for what we surmise is a mighty 10-core CPU.

To be clear, Intel hasn't launched the Core i7-6950X, not yet anyway. But what the company did do is update its support website for its latest Management Engine software, listing the much anticipated Broadwell-E part as a compatible chip. So in that way, you can say Intel confirmed its existence, whether that was intentional or someone on the company's web team jumped the gun.


Read full article @ HotHardware

Kingston 32GB UHS-I U3 microSDHC Review
As media playback formats increase the need for faster MicroSD cards has increased. With 2K/4K video playback and burst mode (Continuous still images on on DSLR cameras) older MicroSD cards just can’t keep up with todays needs. Face it most people going into your local mass merchandise store looks at MicroSD cards and the lowest price highest capacity is usually what ends up in the shopping cart. Often those are Class 4 MicroSD and only required to run at 4 MB/s minimum which is a pretty abysmal speed by today’s standards, only recommended for up to 720p playback. Fast forward to today’s 2K/4K needs and you will need to go to UHS class 10 running at 45 MB/s read 10 MB/s write which is still pretty slow on the write end of flash storage (HD and Burst Mode Photography but not 4K/2K). If you don’t mind spending a dollar or two more you can get a UHS-I Speed Class 3 (U3) that runs at 90 MB/s read 90 MB/s write and fully capable of supporting 2K/4K playback.

Kingston has long been known for their memory products including microSD. If you are looking to increase the speed of that new DSLR camera or playback 2K/4K video you will be hard pressed to find a better or faster Micro SD than the Kingston 32GB UHS-1 U3 microSDHC card. Running at 90 MB/s read and 80 MB/s write.


Read full article @ Bjorn3D

Microsoft Build 2016 post-analysis (and why developers are happy again)
Last week Microsoft held their annual developer conference called Build out in San Francisco. Two high-profile keynote speeches flank the three-day event by various Microsoft executives detailing and demonstrating the vision for computing that Microsoft foresees. In between that are hundreds of mini-seminars on Windows development detailing what is new. Before Build, I gave an outline to set expectations. I tried to drive home the point that Build's messaging is for developers and not consumers. Sure, if you are a consumer you could get a sneak peek of things to come, but this event was by no means a continuation of the hardware launch event held by Microsoft in New York City, which was 100 percent consumer facing.


Read full article @ Windows Central

ROCCAT Ryos MK FX Review
A little while ago we took a look at the ROCCAT Ryos TKL Pro, which is the compact Tenkeyless version of the Ryos keyboard. The interesting design, unique features and its solid performance really helped it stand out, since then we have been eager to get our hands on a full RGB Ryos keyboard.

The Ryos MK FX has a feature list that reads like various others in its series, including Cherry MX switches, dual 32bit ARM processors, 2MB of on board memory, as well as having a built in wrist rest and thumbster buttons. However the Ryos MK FX gets a full RGB lighting makeover and is supported by ROCCAT Swarm, ROCCAT's unified driver software.


Read full article @ Vortez

Sama Forza Titanium 800 W
SAMA is a Chinese PSU manufacturer which, for the moment at least, doesn't seem terribly interested in retail markets outside of Asia. However, this isn't the case for companies looking to find new OEMs for their products. Today, we will look at SAMA's flagship, the Forza Titanium, with a capacity of 800W.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

Speedlink Parthica Core gaming keyboard review
Although we spend a lot of time here extolling the virtues of mechanical keyboards and their switches, there is no denying that they are generally quite expensive. This is why sometimes you have to consider membrane designs.

With Speedlink’s membrane based Parthica Core, you get programmable buttons, backlighting options, macro editing and adjustable response times of a high-end board – but at a much lower price point.


Read full article @ KitGuru

X2 Spitzer 20 PC Chassis Review
We review the new X2 Spitzer 20 PC Chassis, a product series shows design and positions itself in a more mainstream Market. The chassis is available in two versions, the full tower SPITZER 20 and the micro tower SPITZER 22 version, for those who prefer a smaller and lightweight enclosure. We review the Spitzer 20 with closed side panel - join us in the review.

As you are going to notice, this chassis is moderately compact in size for something that is advertised as a full-tower,it however is light-weight and nice to look at. This SPITZER 20 chassis can house mini-ITX, micro ATX or ATX motherboards and offers a decent enough amount of of space to install your precious goods.

The SPITZER 20 is a full-tower PC gamer case with 7 expansion slots and support for the installation of long graphics cards ( maximum 370mm length VGA card ). Adding some more cooling is optional as well with the 4x 120mm and 3x 80mm fan mount locations throughout this chassis. Proposing stress-free upkeep shortcuts like tool-free removal of side panels and drives. Front USB3.0 and HD Audio AC97 peripheral connections offer a multimedia gateway. Constructed out of 0.5mm SPCC steel with strengthened EMI shielding the SPITZER 20


Read full article @ Guru3D

Z170 Motherboard Charts: 17 Models tested - MSI Z170I Gaming Pro AC
In our comparison tables, meanwhile you find benchmark values regarding 17 recent Z170 motherboards. Furthermore we do not comment the benchmark values. The idea and also the goal is to present to you a market overview which helps you choose the right motherboard.


Read full article @ ocaholic




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