EVGA SuperNOVA 850 G5 Power Supply Unit Review and more
Posted on: 10/16/2019 10:26 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

ADATA XPG Spectrix D60G DDR4-3200 16GB Memory Kit Review
AKiTiO Node Lite SE Thunderbolt 3 Review
Alphacool EISBAER Ex BLACK LCS Review
AMD B550A System Spotted: OEM Only Chipset, PCIe 3.0
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X CPU Review
AOC CQ32G1 QHD Curved 144Hz Monitor Review
AOC U2790PQU 27in 4K Professional Monitor Review
Aorus CV27Q Review
ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming ITX/TB3 Review
Destiny 2: Shadowkeep Review
Disco Elysium Review
EVGA SuperNOVA 850 G5 Power Supply Unit Review
Garmin Venu Review
Hands on with Google's Pixelbook Go laptop
HyperX Cloud Alpha S 7.1 Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review
Intel Reiterates That Its 10nm Desktop Processors Are Coming
iStorage datAshur PRO2 Review
MSI MPG X570 Gaming Edge WiFi Review
MSI Trident X 9th Review
Patriot P200 Performance SSD Review
Patriot Viper RGB 16GB DDR4-3600 Memory Kit Review
PNY Pro Elite 1TB External SSD Drive Review
Silverstone Lucid LD03 Review
The Different Types of Overclocking

ADATA XPG Spectrix D60G DDR4-3200 16GB Memory Kit Review
Last year was really the year of RGB DDR4 memory, pretty much every major player has some type of RGB memory and for good reason. Adding RGB LEDs to a memory kit just makes your build look so much better. With so many RGB kits out there it is a little hard for companies to have their RGB DDR4 kits stand out from the rest. Well ADATA thinks that they might have a solution in their XPG Spectrix D60G, which offers a very unique diamond-cut RGB diffuser that covers almost the entire module making for a very attractive memory kit once you have these installed and all lit up. Today we will be checking out the AX4U320038G16-DT60 which is a 16GB (2x8GB) kit that runs at 3200 MHz with timings of 16-18-18 at 1.35V. Is this the ultimate RGB memory kit? Read on to find out!


Read full article @ ThinkComputers.org

AKiTiO Node Lite SE Thunderbolt 3 Review
AKiTiO for the longest time has been the driver behind many OEM Thunderbolt 3 solutions. Joining the team at OWC earlier in the year, we have yet to see what's in store for the AKiTiO team but today we look at one of their latest solutions; the Node Lite SE I was first introduced to the Node Lite Optane in May of 2018. Since then, as mentioned above, AKiTiO has been acquired by OWC putting much of their product line in limbo. To this point, the Node Lite with Optane is no longer available and OWC has resorted to selling the Special Edition enclosure without Optane.


Read full article @ TweakTown

Alphacool EISBAER Ex BLACK LCS Review
Today, we are reviewing an AIO cooler from Alphacool: the EISBAER EXTREME BLACK EDITION. It’s the best thing Alphacool has to offer in the AIO segment of the liquid coolers market. Alphacool is an experienced OEM specializing in water cooling components and accessories responsible for, among others, the be quiet! Silent Loop coolers.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

AMD B550A System Spotted: OEM Only Chipset, PCIe 3.0
In every motherboard generation on AMDs AM4 socket, we have seen a premium motherboard chipset and a more budget friendly chipset play out in the market. For the latest generation, focusing on Ryzen 3000 processors, we only have the X570 chipset in the market right now, and were expecting to see a B550 chipset and motherboards built on that chipset at somepoint in the future. B550 hasnt been announced yet, but one avid Reddit user has spotted an OEM system built on the B550A chipset in stores. The existance of B550A has been verified by an AMD employee.

AMD’s B550A chipset belongs to the company’s Promontory-LP family and therefore supports 2+4 PCIe Gen 3 lanes, two USB 3.2 Gen 2 links, and six USB 2.0 connectors. The chipset is supposed to support overclocking, yet since it is only available to OEMs, it is up to them to support the feature. The key capabilty of the B550A is that is has been validated to support AMDs Ryzen 3000 desktop processors.


Read full article @ Anandtech

AMD Ryzen 5 3600X CPU Review
Here at the FPSReview, we’ve covered AMD’s Ryzen 3000 series in depth. We’ve talked about the various models at each price point. You would almost think that would be the end of it, but each model will perform differently and given a certain price point, compare either more or less favorably to its competition. As a result, we will take a look at specific models in more detail and provide data for comparison to our previous coverage. Today, we are looking at AMD’s Ryzen 5 3600X. However, if you’ve seen our coverage of earlier models, then much of this is going to come across to you as being a re-hash of earlier articles. In which case, you can skip around as needed to look at the performance metrics and conclusion page.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, frozen in a vault, from a parallel universe or simply just got into DIY computing, you’ve probably heard who AMD is. The company was established 50 years ago and in the early days made a name for itself in memory manufacturing. In the late 1970’s and early 1980’s AMD was a second source supplier of Intel CPU designs.


Read full article @ The FPS Review

AOC CQ32G1 QHD Curved 144Hz Monitor Review
Gaming monitors are plentiful these days, ranging from affordable 1080p models right up to flagship models that can cost over £2000. So, it’s a fair assumption that there’s a model for just about everyone. There are a few key points that (most) gamers target though, such as 1440p resolution, as it’s a good mixture of high resolution, while not being as demanding on your GPU requirements as 4K. Then you also have higher refresh rates, such as 144Hz for silky smooth gameplay. Finally, panel size, as gaming on a 31.5″ is going to be more immersive than a 19″ panel. As you might have guessed, the AOC CQ32G1 we have in the office today is 31.5″, 144Hz and 1440p. However, it doesn’t stop there. This surprisingly affordable monitor also features a curved panel, FreeSync, and a 1ms response rate.

The latest AOC monitor is clearly ticking all the right boxes for the majority of modern PC gamers. However, it manages to keep the cost very low. To do this, AOC fitted the CQ32G1 with a VA panel, a fairly basic stand, just two display inputs, no speakers, and honestly, that’s about it. It’s not exactly bare-bones, but it’s not exactly dripping in extra blind either. I’m perfectly fine with that though.


Read full article @ eTeknix

AOC U2790PQU 27in 4K Professional Monitor Review
he AOC U2790PQU brings 4K to an incredible new low price. The U2790PQU certainly doesn’t seem to skimp in any part of its specification. Aside from the 4K (3,840 x 2,160) resolution, the panel uses IPS technology, which usually comes at a premium. The maximum 4K refresh is just 60Hz and pixel response 5ms, but both are pretty standard for a 4K IPS panel. The maximum brightness is a reasonable 350cd/m2, and static contrast 1,000:1, again typical for IPS.


Read full article @ KitGuru

Aorus CV27Q Review
Curved QHD at 165Hz. We came away pleasantly surprised when Aorus made its foray into the world of PC monitors with the award-winning AD27QD back in January. Hoping to build on that initial promise, the Gigabyte subsidiary has moved quickly to expand its portfolio with various new models aimed at specific gaming audiences.

Appreciating the fact that today's panel technologies each have something different to offer, Aorus is hedging its bets by attempting to cover all bases. The 24.5in KD25F, for example, employs a 1080p TN panel with a 0.5ms response time and ultra-fast 240Hz refresh rate that is well-suited to FPS gaming. For those who prefer IPS, the larger 27in FI27Q touts a 1440p IPS panel with a 1ms response and 165Hz refresh rate, and is now available for pre-order at a cost of £570.


Read full article @ Hexus

ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming ITX/TB3 Review
With power hungry chipsets and powerful CPUs, the new X570 chipset has a slew of design challenges to overcome to squeeze the most out of the new platform. The ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming ITX/TB3 promises to harness that performance in a tiny Mini-ITX package.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

Destiny 2: Shadowkeep Review
When Bungie announced their (not so) recent split with Activision, many were left wondering what the fate of their spacefaring multiplayer series would become. Without the backing of a major publisher, Bungie was cut loose to seek out the destiny they wanted for themselves, for lack of a better term. As the first major expansion to be released since going independent, Shadowkeep represents a look forward at what’s to come for the universe of Destiny 2 and beyond.

One thing that’s important to keep in mind with Destiny 2: Shadowkeep is that this isn’t the major expansion that comes every couple of years after the release of a mainline Destiny title (that honor went to last year’s Forsaken release). Instead, Destiny 2: Shadowkeep is the medium-sized expansion that still brings in plenty of content for the average player. I first came back to Shadowkeep after a hiatus where the last major piece of content that I played was the Leviathan Raid (and I was a damn good ball-running Warlock). This meant no Curse of Osiris, no Warmind, no Year 2. All of that content was brand new to me, but I wanted to start off my newly-boosted-to-750 Warlock with a quick trip to the Moon.


Read full article @ Wccftech

Disco Elysium Review
Tabletop roleplaying games don’t always refer to themselves as games. It's a bit of challenge given what the G stands for in RPG, but it makes sense in a way. When all the players sit around the table with Games Master at the helm, it isn’t exactly about winning. It's about telling stories. Cooperative storytelling experiences are some of the most satisfying and fascinating experiences you can have, and Disco Elysium might the first video game that captures that same feeling.

In Disco Elysium, you are a detective trying to resolve a murder. From the looks of things, you’ve solved it once, got blackout drunk and destroyed all your deductions. Bravo! But while you’re doing all these things that look and sound like your typical top-down RPG, like dialogue branches, ability checks, and searching the environment, the experience itself is quite different. You never exactly feel like you’re competing against the computer. Even when NPCs are purposely withholding evidence, and you know it, it all adds to the story. Instead, it feels like you’re working with the game to tell a story.


Read full article @ Wccftech

EVGA SuperNOVA 850 G5 Power Supply Unit Review
The very first power supply unit by EVGA to arrive in our lab is the brand new SuperNOVA 850 G5 and it's just what we've come to expect by them. Time and again we've pointed out the many reasons as to the why consumers always need to have a good power supply unit installed in their systems, especially if those systems feature high-end CPU's and graphics cards. We've also pointed out in all our previous power supply unit reviews that models released by large brands/manufacturers are almost always reliable and even though build quality, rail stability, electrical efficiency, number of connectors, output wattage and even noise levels all do change from model to model things which can actually cause damage to your system (such as ripple) are no longer a serious concern (if at all). With that out of the way as many of you are aware, we recently started cooperating with EVGA and so today marks our very first PSU review of one of their models and more specifically the brand new SuperNOVA 850 G5.

EVGA is the #1 NVIDIA authorized partner in channel sales throughout North America. Based on the philosophy of intelligent innovation, market knowledge, and the real time operation, EVGA continues to identify the need in the market place and providing the solution to that need. By offering product differentiation, a 90 day Step-Up program, and other customer focused programs, EVGA is a clear leader in all categories: etail, retail, distribution, and system builders. With headquarters in Brea, CA, EVGA's global coverage includes EVGA GmbH in Munich, EVGA LATAM in Miami, and EVGA Hong Kong. For further information online about EVGA, visit https://www.evga.com.



Read full article @ NikKTech

Garmin Venu Review
Garmin dives into AMOLED with this $399 smartwatch, but the execution is shallow.


Read full article @ ArsTechnica

Hands on with Google's Pixelbook Go laptop
Google today announced the Pixelbook Go, a 2.3-pound laptop that's sort of meant to be a successor to the original, two-year-old Pixelbook. It's a clamshell laptop though, but it's pretty cool.


Read full article @ Neowin

HyperX Cloud Alpha S 7.1 Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review
Way back in 2017, HyperX unveiled their original Cloud Alpha. At the time, we were extremely impressed. With its dual-chamber drivers, excellent tuning, lush memory foam cushioning, and affordable $99 price, we were in love. Last month, HyperX released its successor, the HyperX Cloud Alpha S. It brings back everything we liked about the original and adds in surround sound and a mixer for game streaming. Is it enough for a headset in 2019? Let?s find out!


Read full article @ MMORPG

Intel Reiterates That Its 10nm Desktop Processors Are Coming
It’s been an interesting week for Intel so far, and it’s only just begun. Yesterday, German tech site HardwareLUXX reported that Intel would be shelving its 10nm desktop processor ambitions, meaning we’d only ever be seeing the chips in notebooks or similar devices. As an observer of Intel’s 10nm journey, it’s unfortunately not difficult to believe the news. Intel has had an enormous challenge getting 10nm off of the ground in a notable way, at a time when its competition is seriously aggressive.

Following this news, Intel released a simple statement to deflect it: “We continue to make great progress on 10nm, and our current roadmap of 10nm products includes desktop.” That didn’t sit well with many fans, since it could be spun so many different ways. The mention of “products” rather than “processors” sticks out, but Intel cleared the air with Tom’s Hardware that “Desktop Products” in this party line means “Desktop Processors”.


Read full article @ Techgage

iStorage datAshur PRO2 Review
The datAshur PRO2 is the latest in encrypted hardware storage from iStorage. The PRO2 is a USB 3.2 Gen 1 USB flash drive with a 10-key pad for pin combinations from 7-15 digits, built-in AES-XTS 256-bit full disk hardware encryption engine, and is available in capacities ranging from 4-512 GB. A built-in battery keeps the device secure even when pulled hot or power losses occur.


Read full article @ Neoseeker

MSI MPG X570 Gaming Edge WiFi Review
Welcome to another OCC review! Today, we are going to look at the MSI MPG Gaming Edge WiFi edition, which is aimed at filling the gap between a basic budget setup and something on the higher end. MSI has a long history of releasing many variations using the same chipset to fill all the needs of each type of build. From the truly basic motherboard like the MPG Gaming to the extreme heavy hitter GODLIKE series, rest assured that each one maximizes its targeted price point. The Gaming Edge is no exception and carries many of the desired traits, like RGB lighting and overclocking. This motherboard has a bit of everything and doesn't break the bank.


Read full article @ OCC

MSI Trident X 9th Review
MSI's Trident X 9th series of gaming PCs delivers uncompromising entertainment thanks to a design that offers not only high performance, but low noise levels as well, making it perfect for the living room where it will quickly become a focal point due to the RGB lighting.

In today's review, I will be looking at MSI's Trident X 9th 9SE-06STW. This model features an Intel Core i7-9700K alongside an MSI NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ventus OC. Rounding out the typical specifications are 16 GB of DDR4, a 256 GB SSD, and a 2 TB HDD for storage, all inside a Mini-ITX chassis the size of a typical game console. It also has RGB lighting because well, why wouldn't it? Before we dig any deeper, let us take a look at the system's full specifications.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

Patriot P200 Performance SSD Review
Over the years SSDs have transformed themselves from a new and uncertain storage medium to the defacto standard when it comes to performance storage options. There is no question that SSD drives are faster and the capacity has been getting better however there is a sweet spot where price, performance and capacity all converge.

In this review I’ll be looking at a new Performance SSD from Patriot called the P200. This drive is built on the SATA 6 standard and is available in four sizes from 256GB up to 2TB. As with all SSD drives it is important to find a drive with a good controller matched with wear leveling technology to ensure the longest life for your SSD as this will reflect well on TBW and overall drive performance.


Read full article @ Hardware Asylum

Patriot Viper RGB 16GB DDR4-3600 Memory Kit Review
Last month, we had a chance to take a look at the Patriot Viper 4 Blackout, which was designed for new chipsets like the AMD X570. It performed pretty well and we really liked it. Today, we will be taking a look at a different memory kit from Patriot that offers similar specification – the Viper RGB 16GB DDR4-3600 CL17.

The main difference between the two mentioned memory kits seems to be the RGB lighting and design, but there’s more than just looks. Stay with us to find out what is hiding under the aggressive-looking heatsinks with RGB lighting.


Read full article @ FunkyKit

PNY Pro Elite 1TB External SSD Drive Review
It's a very light and compact external SSD drive, priced at £135. Probably better known for their range of Nvidia based graphics cards – be it consumer or Quadro – than anything else, PNY has added a small range of fast external SSDs to their product portfolio. Dubbed the Pro Elite, these external drives use a USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-C interface and come priced around the £135 mark.


Read full article @ KitGuru

Silverstone Lucid LD03 Review
When Silverstone offered to send over their new Lucid LD03, we were immediately intrigued. In a market dominated by downsized versions of popular mid-tower cases and uninspiring cube cases, the Silverstone Lucid LD03 appeared to offer a fresh new take on the very idea of what an ITX case could be, with its asymmetrical glass panels, angular vents, and a vertical airflow design reminiscent of Silverstone’s own Raven series or Phanteks’s Shift cases. So does the Silverstone Lucid LD03 live up to its looks? That’s what we are going to find out.

The LD03 is part of Silverstone’s new Lucid line that also includes the MATX LD01 and LD02, however, it shares little in common with the other two Lucid cases beyond its use of tempered glass panels. Whereas the LD01 and LD02 are fairly standard MATX cases, the LD03 uses the rotated layout pioneered by Silverstone’s Raven cases to circumvent the airflow issues that have plagued modern tempered glass cases.


Read full article @ Modders-Inc

The Different Types of Overclocking
Overclocking can be summarized into four different segments. Many of the segments overlap, which is part of the fun. First you have the Factory overclock. This is the type where you “buy” your level of performance and can be as simple as buying a Core i9 over a Core i7 or something more involved like picking up an EVGA RTX FTW that comes “hot clocked” from the factory and a special board design to increase stability.

The next level is the casual overclocker and this really describes the person who buys the factory overclocked hardware but instead of running the hardware out the box decides to push things a little further. So that Core i9 they bought is now running overclocked and they enabled XMP on their 3600Mhz memory to support the two factory overclocked video cards they are running.


Read full article @ Hardware Asylum


Printed from CompatDB (https://www.compatdb.org/news/story/evga_supernova_850_g5_power_supply_unit_review_and_more.html)