Aorus X3 Plus v5 gaming laptop reviewed and more
Posted on: 04/02/2016 07:53 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

Aorus' X3 Plus v5 gaming laptop reviewed
Case Mod Friday: MSI Scratch Build
Cooltek Jonsbo RM1 ATX Mini Tower Review
Far Cry Primal - GPU / CPU / Memory / OC Performance scaling
Fedora 23 finally running on Lenovo G50-70! Results
Kaspersky Internet Security Review
Little Tikes kidBoard Keyboard: An Industry Standard
Mechanical keyboards review: for the professional
Noctua NH-L9x65 Review
Patriot Viper Elite PC4-24000 2x8GB DDR4 RAM Review

Aorus' X3 Plus v5 gaming laptop reviewed
Aorus' X3 Plus v5 laptop packs eight threads of Skylake processing power and a GeForce GTX 970M graphics card into a 14" chassis. We put the X3 Plus v5 to the test to see whether it ushers in a new era of portable computing power.


Read full article @ The Tech Report

Case Mod Friday: MSI Scratch Build
Welcome to another Case Mod Friday showcase! This week we have Thái Sơn Đặng's MSI Scratch Build. We discovered this scratch build / mod in the Watercooled PC group on Facebook.  We were instantly blown away by what a clean build this was and how incredibly compact it is.  This is definitely one of the best mod's we've seen so far this year.  The craftsmanship is great and the way he's done the watercooling is unbelievable.


Read full article @ ThinkComputers.org

Cooltek Jonsbo RM1 ATX Mini Tower Review
A while back a friend came to me looking for a high quality compact HTPC oriented case with enough room to fit a full ATX mainboard, long graphics card and a regular sized (ATX form factor) power supply unit (i forgot to mention budget friendly). Personally i don't follow things in that particular area of the market/industry because I’ve always preferred large towers to house all my systems but i since i do read all the PR that lands in my inbox i have a good idea of what's out there. Still a compact PC case with enough room for all of the above is not something we see a lot and usually quality is not that great to begin with. Cooltek is among a handful of manufacturers that focus a lot in the design and manufacture of compact cases (they do under their Jonsbo brand) and so one of the obvious choices was the RM1 which we got to test and see if it has everything consumers like my friend would want from such a case.

Cooltek offers you high-quality PC cases and accessories at an outstanding price-performance-ratio. Our products meet internationally recognized quality standards and are distinguished by their durability and exceptional value for money. Our main area of expertise are a broad variety of PC cases, ranging from small HTPC-formats- like the award winning Coolcube family - to full-fledged Midi-Tower chassis that offer outstanding features for small costs. Besides our line of PC cases, we offer you selected products from the areas of noise reduction, PC modding, cooling and high-end power supplies. By choosing Cooltek products you opt for innovative technology and leading designs.

Just like the UMX2 Mini-ITX case which we reviewed a while back the Jonsbo RM1 is made almost entirely out of magnesium aluminum alloy but unlike the first it has enough space inside for a full ATX mainboard, long graphics cards (up to 290mm), full sized ATX power supply unit and a full sized 5.25" optical drive (with mATX/mITX mainboard). Unfortunately since the RM1 is a very compact case the ability to add all the above cuts down in other areas such as room for large CPU coolers (only up to 95mm tall) and hard disk drive and fan mounts. So by default although the RM1 has room for three 2.5" drives and one 3.5" drive if you decide to install a 5.25" optical drive you will just have room for two 2.5" drives and one 3.5" drive (not to mention you will not be able to use an ATX mainboard). Also unlike its successor the RM2 (expect a review of that soon) the RM1 only has room for a single intake 120mm fan placed at the front. Still although it does have some restrictions the RM1 looks like it can offer much more compared to similar cases so let’s check it out.


Read full article @ NikKTech

Far Cry Primal - GPU / CPU / Memory / OC Performance scaling
On the following pages we're going to have a close look at how Far Cry Primal performs in combination with an overclocked Intel Core i7-6700K Skylake CPU as well as overclocked memory. We're also going to show you the effect when both memory and CPU have been overclocked and that we do in combination with nine different, recent graphics cards and at three resolutions: 1080p, 1440p as well as 2160p at ultra settings.


Read full article @ ocaholic

Fedora 23 finally running on Lenovo G50-70! Results
This is not an April Fools' joke. It's alive, it's alive! Finally! After a bit of magic, it runs. So I've written a review of Fedora 23 64-bit Gnome edition on a Lenovo G50 laptop, with UEFI, Secure Boot, and GPT, covering partitioning and installation in a seven-boot mixed setup with Linux and Windows 10, hardware detection and compatibility, webcam, Bluetooth support, familiar Realtek Wireless card bug, applications and customization, performance, system resource usage, battery life, other considerations, and more. Enjoy.


Read full article @ Dedoimedo

Kaspersky Internet Security Review
Kaspersky Internet Security is a long-standing security program for the Windows operating system by Russian security firm Kaspersky. The program sits functionality-wise between the company's Anti-Virus and Total Security offerings.


Read full article @ gHacks

Little Tikes kidBoard Keyboard: An Industry Standard
The Little Tikes kidBoard: the name says it all. An undisputed titan of computer peripherals, the engineers at Little Tikes have set the bar higher than ever with their newest release. The kidBoard incorporates an incredible combination of bleeding-edge software, phonics integration, and hardware mastery to create the next generation of gaming keyboards.


Read full article @ Modders-Inc

Mechanical keyboards review: for the professional
Mechanical keyboards are extremely popular at the moment, at least if we look at the available keyboards on the market. For our new comparison test we received a total of 16 models by 11 different manufacturers. Which one should you get?

Originally keyboards with mechanical switches, as we should call this type of keyboard, have been popular among professional typists: writers and programmers. These users were left with classics such as the IBM Model M and brands like Filco and Ducky. However for some time now a new target audience has arisen that is interested in these keyboards: PC-gamers.

The hardware-industry has identified the PC-gamer as someone that is prepared to pay a lot of money for high-end hardware. In a shrinking market this means that a lot of products, from cases to power supplies to motherboards, are given a twist so as to appeal to this audience. The same can be seen when looking at mechanical keyboards: it does not even matter if there are extras that have an added value for gamers, practically all of them are targeted towards this audience.


Read full article @ Hardware.Info

Noctua NH-L9x65 Review
Over the past eight years of reviewing, even with all of the different heatsinks and water cooling options we have covered there has been one constant. In nearly every build or test bench if we weren’t going with water cooling Noctua coolers have been at the top of our list. Recently as far as full sized builds go everything that wasn’t a test bench has been water cooled, but the small form factor builds have nearly all been sporting Noctua NH-L9i’s. This has partially been because I like Noctua’s low noise but more than anything the NH-L9i just kept them all cool and took up less space than even a stock cooler. Recently though I have been working on building a new Lunchbox project build, we have been collecting parts and covering them in various reviews. Well when I got everything together the NH-L9i just couldn’t handle the higher heat output that the i7-6700K was putting out. This wasn’t a big shock given the coolers 65 watt cooling rating and the heat issues that same CPU gave us even with a full sized cooler on our test bench. So this gave me the chance to test out the slightly larger NH-L9x65 from Noctua. Today I’m going to talk about how it performed and run through its features. You can also get a sneak peek at our upcoming build!


Read full article @ LanOC Reviews

Patriot Viper Elite PC4-24000 2x8GB DDR4 RAM Review
Before we begin, let me just make it clear there are no April Fools joke in this article. Now that we have all that cleared up, let me ask you a quick question: How much does presentation affect the perception of quality? In 2007, a man spent a cold January morning playing six classical pieces for 45 minutes at the entrance to a subway station in Washington DC. During this time, thousands of people went through the station. Among all the people who passed by, only seven people stopped by to listen, and just one person recognized the man playing was none other than renowned musician Joshua Bell, using his handcrafted 1713 Stradivarius violin reportedly worth $3.5 million dollars. Ironically, three days earlier, Joshua Bell played to a full house at Boston's Symphony Hall, with preferred seating tickets running as high as $100 each. How could there be such a big contrast? At its core, it is still the same person with the same music. The difference, of course, came down to presentation. At the concert hall, people knew who Joshua Bell was, and they were in the right setting to be ready to listen. However, at the subway station, no one knew who he was, and nobody was expecting his performance, nor were they ready to appreciate the music. Clearly, presentation has a huge effect on the perception of quality. Even if you were a world class violinist, if not marketed accordingly, will not give you the attention you deserve. Earlier on this year, I reviewed the Patriot Viper 4 PC4-22400 2x8GB, a great performing memory kit with good looks to boot. Today, we will take a look at a model from Patriot's new Viper Elite lineup. One could say, at its core, the Viper Elite series is the same as the Viper 4 series with a different heatspreader. If you look at the specifications for DDR4-3000 kits in both lineups, you will notice they even operate at the same latencies and voltage. What kind of change will a heatspreader bring? Read on to find out!


Read full article @ APH Networks




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