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Debian or gentoo?


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#1 PenguinBiker

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 12:04 AM

I'm currently running SuSe 8.2 pro (been running suse 2 years now)and i am thinking of switching over the debian or gentoo.
i'll be useing it for photo editing and lots of gaming
oh and good usb support is inportant to me



Specs
- CPU - athlon xp 1700+
- architecture - i386
- 2 40 gb hard drives
- Atapi 16x DVD-ROM
- Lite-on 32x burner
- GeForce4 Ti 4200
- 256 ddr memory
- SiS900 10/100 Ethernet
- SiS7012 PCI sound

#2 Philipp

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 03:22 PM

If you like to try Debian, I would suggest that you download Knoppix:
http://www.knopper.n...dex-old-en.html

Knoppix is an installable Linux LiveCD based on the unstable branch (SID) of Debian.

To install Knoppix to your harddisk:
1) Boot the OS from CD
2) Open a shell window
3) Enter sudo /usr/local/bin/knx-hdinstall (return) and follow the instructions

To upgrade Knoppix to the latest SID packages (e.g. OpenOffice 1.1RC, KDE 3.1.3 etc.):

Replace /etc/apt/sources.list with
Code:
deb http://ftp.debian.org/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib
deb-src http://ftp.debian.org/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib


Then open a shell window and run:
su -
apt-get update
apt-get upgrade

#3 paulten

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 03:34 PM

I recommend Gentoo. I have some experiance with Debian and sid, but not with knoppix.
Gentoo has a very good installation manual, and overall documentation. And if you should encounter problems, visit the friendly forum.

Good luck

Paul

#4 PenguinBiker

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 05:19 PM

i think i'll go with gentoo

just a note while i have a ethernet card i do not have an accual broadband connection i use a external v.92/v.44 modem

so i'll order the cd's from their site

#5 Kenzo

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 05:20 PM

I'm on my fourth try (in the past 6 months) installing Gentoo.

1. Forums are very active and helpful when you run into problems (and you will). Note that you will want to have net access available during your Gentoo installation journey, either using a second machine (preferable) or by dual-booting your primary machine and using whatever other OS or flavor of Linux you already have installed.
2. Gentoo can be optimized for your hardware by changing compiler "flags". Actually recompiling everything (or compiling everything from scratch when you install) will take days for a desktop workstation setup. No, I'm not kidding.
3. A significant number of Gentoo's 'ebuild' files (they contain instructions on where to download source code for programs you want to install and instructions on how to compile and install them) have broken links and require manual editing of the ebuild files. This will require you to search for the files on the net and interrupt the installation process.

In summary, the final result of a Gentoo install will be a sturdy, fast system, if you can make it through the install. For a newbie, plan on about a couple days to a week to get the basics up and running, and another week for final tweaking of your peripherals, depending on what they are. You should try a Stage 3 install as opposed to a Stage 1 or 2, because most of the compilations steps will have been pre-optimized and completed for you. If you don't have broadband, Stage 3 install will be essential.

Have fun!

#6 PenguinBiker

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Posted 16 September 2003 - 06:40 PM

ok while i think i'll go with gentoo i'll try a cd boot version of gentoo and Knoppix before i make a final decision. does knoppix have that get_apt command?

#7 Philipp

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Posted 18 September 2003 - 11:14 AM

Quote:
does knoppix have that get_apt command?


Yes, every Debian based Linux comes with apt smile

#8 Admiral LSD

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Posted 18 September 2003 - 06:24 PM

Quote:
3. A significant number of Gentoo's 'ebuild' files (they contain instructions on where to download source code for programs you want to install and instructions on how to compile and install them) have broken links and require manual editing of the ebuild files. This will require you to search for the files on the net and interrupt the installation process.


Bear in mind that any manual edits to the ebuild files in the main /usr/portage directory will be overwritten the next time you emerge sync but in all seriousness, I can't honestly remember the last time I had an ebuild die on me due to it not finding the source files. It's quite common to find some of the mirrors are slower to update than others but usually it'll fall back to the original download location (usually the project home page) and download just fine.

Quote:
If you don't have broadband, Stage 3 install will be essential.


Speak for yourself :P

I've done a number of Stage 1 installs over my dial-up connection all you need is a little patience as it'll take anywhere from 3-4 days to a week to get everything up and running.

#9 Kenzo

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Posted 18 September 2003 - 07:53 PM

I do like Gentoo and its particular way of managing packages. I had seven broken ebuilds during the most recent install over the last week or so, but obviously not everyone will emerge the same things.

Stage 1 from dialup? You, sir, are the most patient person ever.

cheers,
kenzo

#10 PenguinBiker

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 05:04 PM

ok i got gentoo yesterday and i stated to install it but i ran into a problem i'm a little confused on how to setup a dialup modem during the install how do you do it?



gentoo linux for athlon xp
i have a best data v.92/v.44 56k modem[/img]

#11 cruark

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 05:49 AM

For modems, a good idea is to check the Chipset on the modem. There is pretty good support for Conexant chipsets and I have had a lot of luck getting them to work. To locate your chipset, you may want to see what 'lspci' brings to the table. If that doesn't give you anything useful, pull out the modem and check the chip on the modem, note: you may have to pull the goofy sticker that some modem manufacturers place over the controller chip.

#12 PenguinBiker

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 05:40 PM

i know the modem works i jsut have having trouble getting it to work in the install so i resorted to a stage3 GRP install and i'm going to get my modem working after i have the rest of my system working




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