Jump to content
Compatible Support Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Shadow64Bt

A Note On Overclocking CPUs

Recommended Posts

Alright, I discovered an interesting fluke while overclocking an Athlon XP 2500+ Barton. I jumped the voltage up too high and ended up cooking the chip, and of course, thought to myself "Well. I'm screwed."

Well, funny thing happened, I was waiting for a new chip to be delivered, and was having a discussion with my dad over heat issues in electronics, and he mentioned that back in the 70's, Sony had brought in a video camera using a delicate type of picture tube, and if you left it focused on an image too long, it would overheat and carbon score the tube. They found the solution to fixing this problem after it happened was to place the tubes in a freezer, causing it to expand, and the carbon would fall out, hence making the tube useable again.

Well, that got me thinking, a CPU contains a small vibration node in it, and when it heats up it could possibly sieze up. So, on a hunch, I placed the CPU in the freezer for 24 hours, took it out, and ran it ice cold. Bingo. The sucker has been running for the last 7 months now without a hiccup.

So, I just want to know if anyone else has ever used this method, or if it works for anyone else. Share the knowledge people. laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Complete BS?

 

I dunno, but I've got 2 possibly fried chips due to overclocking.

 

AMD Athlon XP 2800 and an Intel Prescott 2.8

 

Worth a shot, what do I got to lose?

I will report back in a day or two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh, I know, it sounds like a longshot, but as long as the CPU is not physically damaged, this should work. I can't say for sure, as I've only had to try it once. So good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, as i figured neither one worked, i didn't expect much out of the amd, seeing as it's been sitting around for 2 years.

 

what do you mean, exactly, by physically damaged - the pins/connectors?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes, as well as ceramic cracking and heat scoring on the die and casing. Like I said, I don't know if it will work all the time, and it may have been a special case.

I would test it more, but unfortunately, it's an expensive prospect, as Athlon XP CPUs are not exactly growing off trees anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×