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Dapper Dan

Shell script for more than one command

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I'm sure the answer is out there, but I don't seem to be googling for the answer correctly and I keep coming up empty. How do you run more than one command in a shell script so that one command runs immediately after another is completed? Can a string of commands be run in this way indefinitely?

 

Thanks

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I'm a little unsure what you mean. A script file will run from top to bottom and execute commands as it runs from the starting of line 1 to the end of line x.

 

Here is a snippet from some of my code from home:

Quote:

read $remote_dir

ftp -v -i $i <<**

put "./$file_extension.$date.$month.$year.tar.gz"

bye

**

rm ~/ftp_$file_extension.tar.gz

ncpumount ~/comptek

 

This will execute the rm command right after the ftp command...does this help?

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the ** is to give commands to the ftp program.

 

In a file, type in

 

Quote:
mkdir ./temp

touch ./temp/file.txt

echo "something" >> ./temp/file.txt

 

That should run in order...make sure to make it executable, though.

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Make sure to add the #!/bin/sh at the top as well.

 

This tells the PC what to use to truck on through it.

 

Quote:

 

#!/bin/sh

mkdir ./temp

touch ./temp/file.txt

echo "something" >> ./temp/file.txt

 

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Crazykillerman has givng you teh answer. but...

 

What are you trying to acomplish I may already have a script you can hack at. When I get some time I'll post up some of my nautilus scripts I use for various things. Maybe some people can find them helpfull.

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Howdy DapperDan,

 

you can concatenate multiple commands in a script e.g. in this way ...

 

Code:
[sup]#!/bin/shbaseDir="~/script_commands"outFile="$baseDir/testfile_$( date +%Y%m%d-%H%M%S ).txt"alias cmdSeq="mkdir -p $baseDir ; cp /var/log/messages $outFile ; tail -n 5 $outFile"cmdSequnset cmdSeqecho "all done"[/sup]

 

The "alias"-thingie here is necessary and it is also often a quite useful method as e.g. a straight invocation of the commands would not work properly ...

 

Code:
[sup]NO-GO-EXAMPLE ...cmdSeq="mkdir -p $baseDir ; cp /var/log/messages $outFile ; tail -n 5 $outFile"$cmdSeq[/sup]

 

In the above example you'd get error-msgs about invalid commandline options for "mkdir".

 

A step further: If you want to ensure that the command-sequence only runs through if there are no errors encountered, you should concatenate the commands with ampersands ("&") like this ...

 

Code:
[sup]EXAMPLE: ensure proper exec. of previous cmd ...cmdSeq="mkdir -p $baseDir & cp /var/log/messages $outFile & tail -n 5 $outFile"$cmdSeq[/sup]

 

But I'm sure you already knew that one from compiling 2.4-kernels (make & make dep & make xyz & make world_go_round ...".

 

As it goes for a "script corner": I wholehartedly support this idea. And if anyone's interested, I could throw in e.g. an iptables-setup script that utilizes "arrays in bash-scripts" for hosts and services. Neat stuff regarding string handling and "loops" in there smile

 

hope that helps

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