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LinuxCrusader

Help installing Linux on Sony Vaio

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I recently bought a new Sony Vaio PCV-RS310:

 

2.4B GHz Intel Pent. 4

80 GB, ATA-100

256 MB PC2100 DDR-SDRAM

Intel® 845GV integrated graphics

Current OS: WinXP home ed.

 

I've been doing research and I've found nothing out there to try to find out which Lunix would be compatible with this desktop. So my first question is if anybody has had success installing Linux in this type of computer, or which version is it compatible with?

 

I am so desperate to change to Linux, but I haven't had success in installing a previous version of Red Hat Linux 8.0 that I had. When I install this version of Lunix as a dual boot, it is able to install it, but as it is doing its first boot it crashes or goes out of bounds. It fails to boot up when doing something "compatible Eth01" check.

 

Another thing, when switching back to Windows throught the boot loader, which I think is GRUB, it totally messes up my computer and Windows is not able to boot up again.

 

I've already tried installing it a couple of times from a Primary partition that I created (4 Gigs just to try it) and I still can't succeed instaling it. Also, I as am doing the /boot partion throught disk fruid, it gives me a message that this partition might create problems with my type of archetecture and they recommed creating a boot disk, which I didn't and had to restore the whole computer image twice....I really want to have Linux in my computer, so any help will GREATLY appreaciated.

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Never fooled with a Sony laptop, but I would recommend running a live cd disto on it to see how well it works. Have a look at this..

 

If it works well as a live cd on your Sony, chances are it will work as well when installed to hd. Morphix-Gnome is a good choice and works well with our Toshiba Satellite laptop.

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Thank you for the recomendation Dapper Dan, I will try it later tonight. It shouldn't make a difference, right, if it's laptop or desktop 'cause mine is a desktop.

 

If anybody has other recomendations, please let me know.

 

And thank you again Dapper Dan.

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Danleff,

 

I did it from WinXp --"Admistrative Tools -> Computer Management-->Storage-->Disk Management" and created a Primary Dos Partition.

 

However, when I was doing the swap, /, /boot partions through disk fruid, I deleted this partion and then it said "free space" and from there I added the lunix partions (swap, /boot, etc.)

 

I don't know if I am doing the partitions correctly, these are the partitions that I did:

 

---------- 256Ram Swap

/boot 127m ext2

/ allowe all available space ext3

 

Please let me know anything to corrrect this if I'm doing something wrong.

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I didn't know that Sony Vaio came in pc, I thought it was just a laptop. Morphix-Gnome may work out, but you want know until you try it. There's also Knoppix which is the most popular of the live cd distros. With Knoppix or Morphix, you will essentially be getting Debian, but without the murderous Debian install!

 

Danleff knows Knoppix, but Morphix, (which is based on Knoppix) comes with an fdisk partitioning tool and an auto install to hd program. I would recommend something like this..

 

/boot ------------ / ------------ swap ------------ /home

 

You should also use either ext3 or reiserFS as file systems. ext2 is not journalized and will take forever to scan if you don't shut down properly. Also a rule of thumb is, swap should be three times the size of your ram.

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Thank you Dapper Dan...I will try it.

 

The /home partition, how much memory should I assign to it... I'm sorry...I'm a somewhat new to this, so still learning slowly.

 

I really appreciate your feedback...thank you.

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It depends on how much you will be using this space for downloads and such. But, if you have 5 gigs to play with and you are just going to try out the distro, less than 20% of ther total space should be adequate. I found the following article.

 

I know, it refers to a 200 gig drive but the concepts are there;

 

http://www.shortfamilyonline.com/tech/unix/moving-to-linux-partitioning.php

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Guys, after all I decided to try out Mandrake 9.2 on my Sony Vaio since I was thinking it would have the more updated drivers or programs needed for my computer. I love it... laugh

 

Everything seems to be working ok, except my DVD player...won't play movies or copy DVDs. It is a "Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-R5002"...haven't done much research on finding the drivers for this, but if you guys have an insight on this, please let know.

 

Another thing, when it is booting up and doing all the systems check...one of the statements fails to execute. This is what it says "Bringing up interface eth0......[Failed]" - You guys know what this is...is it my ethernet card? If you guys know, please let me know.

 

I had one a couple of more questions. Currently I have DSL, but my ISP (go figure) say that they don't support Linux. Is there a free ISP that you guys connect to? Or how do you configure the internet connection? Is there ISPs (not free service I'm assuming) specifically for linux users. It's a really bummer not being able to connect to the internet.

 

This is my first time using Mandrake and most likely one of the first to install it on this kind of Sony desk top. I wish a lot of people knew more about this...

 

Danleff...that aritcle describing about the partitions really helped..thank you.

 

Dapper Dan, thanks for recommending Morphix. I tried it out and by just trying it out I really couldn't wait to install it in my computer, but for some reason the bootloader never came up and I was never able to access from the hard drive once installed, but it's cool though...Mandrake is awesome and I really haven't begun to really explore its powerful potential.

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I can't help you at all with your DVD ROM, but I can let you know that eth0 is your ethernet card (there are other names, like eth1, but mine is also eth0). If your ISP requires special software, it may not support Linux, most often because the software has to run on the machine, and they more often than not use M$. However, if you connect a router between your DSL modem in some way, (hopfully another member here will know more about this than myself) you can probably use Linux - you may have to have the software running on one - neither the modem nor the DSL service cares what operating system is being used, but the software itself may not run on Linux. My son-in-law had DSL, and at one time, he had two computers connected like I mentioned above. When he built a new computer, he connected it to the DSL, without installing the special software. Nothing changed, except that he decided to use the DSL supplier as his ISP instead of a separate one. 8)

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Maillion is correct, eth0 is the nic (network) card. I connect to Roadrunner without any special software, even though they do not support Linux. The issue is how you have the nic card connected. Generally usb does not work. So, you need to connect the nic to a router and the router to the modem. No usb. If your ISP connects via a dynamic IP address, you should be OK.

 

If the nic card is not recognized, the easiest thing to do is buy an inexpensive NIC pci card at a computer store. Look for a realtek chipset. The cost is about $10.00, so it's worth preventing the hassle.

 

How is the system connected currently, through usb, or not?

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Quote:
If the nic card is not recognized, the easiest thing to do is buy an inexpensive NIC pci card at a computer store. Look for a realtek chipset. The cost is about $10.00, so it's worth preventing the hassle.

How is the system connected currently, through usb, or not?


Maillion and danleff,

I think my network is a Realtek chipset. The system is currently connected simply from my network card in my desktop to a dsl modem...no router.

Yeah My ISP requires installing their special software...but hopefully it'll work with the router...So what I have to do is use a router and connected to the dsl modem, which will be connected to my computer, right. Any recomendations for a good router?

I think my IP should dynamic...I noticed that the last two sets of digits always change with a range...is this supposed to be dynamic?

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The DSL modem shouldn't care if there is a router between it and your computer. A lot of these cable and DSL companies will say they don't support Linux because they simply don't even know what it is, and they can't support something they don't want to understand.

I prefer Linksys. You can pick up a wired Linksys router at a reasonable price. Netgear works well too.

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Quote:
Dapper Dan Posted: Mon Feb 02, 2004 6:40 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The DSL modem shouldn't care if there is a router between it and your computer. A lot of these cable and DSL companies will say they don't support Linux because they simply don't even know what it is, and they can't support something they don't want to understand.
I prefer Linksys. You can pick up a wired Linksys router at a reasonable price. Netgear works well too.


So I finally bought the Linksys (BEFSR41) dsl router...and my understanding is that my computer should be able to connect online if properly configured under linux. Can someone please list the instructions how I would configure this type pf router under mandrake 9.2. Any help will be greatly appreciated. smile

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Never mind guys. I got my DSL working now. Somehow, I figured it out...I don't even know what I did...I guess I remembered what the DNS servers IPs and my gateway (router) IP was....

 

Thank you Dapper Dan, Danleff, Maillion....and everyone else who helped. You're help is really appreciated.

 

I guess the next thing I have to worry about is how to configure my DVD-rom...I'm sure I'll be around for a while asking other questions...

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Great! (I have a couple of situations where I got something to work and can't figure out how I did it!) I hope that when you get the answers to all your question, you will hang around to provide your own answers to others...) 8)

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Quote:
Maillion
Member


Joined: 02 Jan 2004
Posts: 91
Location: Texas, USA
Posted: Tue Feb 03, 2004 9:51 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Great! (I have a couple of situations where I got something to work and can't figure out how I did it!) I hope that when you get the answers to all your question, you will hang around to provide your own answers to others...)



I sure will! smile

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Mailion,

 

I know I alreayd post it this unde the networking section, but no one has replied: http://www.linuxcompatible.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1226

But do you know how I can linux to automatically detect my internet connection through my router. Presently, I have to do it from "Configure this computer in the network and internet section, it's kinda of annoying to else have to open "configure this computer" and login as root to start decteting my internect connection. If you know or anybody else, please let know.

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I wish I could help, really I do, but I'm not at all good at network stuff (I saw your other post, but I don't answer a post unless I am sure of the answer). To do what you mention in your other post, you would have to create a shell script and make an 'application link' (shortcut) on the desk top. (Once you have the script written and made executable.) You might try setting Linux to use DCHP to get the router's ip address (it will have one that is different than the one given by your ISP, I think, which could be your problem). Hopefully, someone else will answer it. When you do the configuration, what changes do you make? Does it not write the changes? I hope someone here will be able to say what file to edit, but with that info, we may be able to create the script, at least 8)

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